Looking to Get in Shape or Lose Weight? Try our BMI and Weight Loss Calculator!

Nutritional Information for Date Coconut Roll

By Jill Corleone, RDN, LD

If you're looking for something to satisfy your sweet tooth, but trying to stay away from your usual candy bar and cookies, you might want to consider a date coconut roll. This dried fruit sweet treat combines the very sweet date with coconut and nuts to create a bite-size treat. The coconut date nut roll is low in calories and a good source of fiber.

Calories

A 2-ounce date coconut roll contains 110 calories. When compared with other sweet snacks, such as a candy bar, which typically contains up to 300 calories per 2-ounce serving, the date coconut roll is a calorie bargain. Substituting the low-calorie treat for your usual candy bar can help you save a significant number of calories and aid in weight control.

Carbohdyrates and Fiber

The carbohydrates in the date coconut roll provide most of the calories. A 2-ounce portion contains 21 grams of carbs, 2 grams of fiber and 18 grams of sugar. While most of the carbs are in the form of sugar, it is not added sugar, but the natural sugar found in the dates. In addition to being low in calories, the date coconut roll is also a good source of fiber, which alleviates constipation, controls hunger and helps lower blood cholesterol levels.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by LIVESTRONG
Brought to you by LIVESTRONG

Fat and Protein

The date coconut roll contains some fat, but it is not a good source of protein. A 2-ounce serving contains 3 grams of total fat, 2 grams of saturated fat and 1 gram of protein. Unfortunately, because it contains coconut, the sweet treat is a source of the cholesterol-raising saturated fat. To help keep your cholesterol under control, try to limit your daily intake of saturated fat to less than 10 percent of your calorie intake, or no more than 20 grams on a 2,000-calorie diet.

Sodium

The date coconut roll does not contain any salt and is very low in sodium. A 2-ounce portion contains just 10 milligrams of sodium. Choosing more low-sodium foods can help reduce your overall intake, and might help reduce your risk of developing high blood pressure, or hypertension. You should keep your daily intake of sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams a day. If you already have hypertension, you should limit your daily sodium to 1,500 milligrams a day.

Iron

Although not significantly high in iron, the date coconut roll can help you meet your needs. A 2-ounce roll meets 2 percent of your daily value for iron. The percent daily value, developed by the Food and Drug Administration, is based on a 2,000-calorie diet for healthy adults. Iron is an essential mineral needed to help hemoglobin carry oxygen throughout your body.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

More Related Articles

Related Articles