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How to Remove Scratches on Polycarbonate Lenses

By Mike Parker ; Updated July 27, 2017

Polycarbonate lenses are favored by athletes and by parents of young children because they are designed to not shatter when they receive a blow. Instead polycarbonate lenses are engineered to crack in a spiderweb pattern to prevent shards from the damaged lens from injuring the eye. Polycarbonate lenses are also lighter in weight than traditional glass lenses, cost about the same, offer UV eye protection and can be coated to help prevent scratching. But no matter how careful you are, occasionally even coated lenses may get scratched.

Check your warranty. Some polycarbonate lenses come with a warranty that will repair or replace scratched lenses at no cost. However, the warranty may be voided if you attempt to remove the scratches yourself.

Squeeze a dime sized amount of regular toothpaste onto a clean, soft, cotton cloth. Rub the toothpaste onto the scratched surface of the polycarbonate lens in a circular motion for ten to twenty seconds.

Dampen a clean, soft, cotton cloth in cool water. Rub the wet cloth over the lens to remove all of the toothpaste.

Dry the lens with a dry clean, soft, cotton cloth. Examine the lens to determine whether the scratch has been completely removed. Deep scratches or multiple scratches may require this procedure to be repeated. If this method does not provide satisfactory results proceed to Step 5.

Apply wax from a black wax china marker to the entire surface of both sides of the lens. Immediately wipe the wax off with a clean, soft, cotton cloth. Buff the lenses with an unsoiled portion of the cloth.

Tips

Depending on your prescription and coating options, and the severity of the scratches, it may be more cost effective to simply replace the lens. Contact your eye care professional before making a decision to repair or replace the lens.

Warnings

Polycarbonate lenses are engineered to strict specifications. Attempting to repair scratched lenses at home may work well, but there is always the possibility that home methods may damage the lenses further. If the lenses are coated, these methods will likely remove or damage the coating.

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