How to Remove Hair From Your Tongue

By Rena Sherwood

If you've ever had a hair get stuck in your throat, then you know how annoying this can be. You also feel that hair long after it has passed through. A hair in the throat can cause a lot of coughing and sometimes choking. You want to get a hair off of your tongue as soon as you feel it. Read on to learn how to remove hair from your tongue.

...

If you've ever had a hair get stuck in your throat, then you know how annoying this can be. You also feel that hair long after it has passed through. A hair in the throat can cause a lot of coughing and sometimes choking. You want to get a hair off of your tongue as soon as you feel it. Read on to learn how to remove hair from your tongue.

As soon as you feel the hair on your tongue, bring a lot of saliva into your mouth and don't swallow. If your hands aren't reasonably clean, go wash them.

Concentrate to feel exactly where that hair is on your tongue.

Stick your tongue out as far as you comfortably can.

Use the fingers of your dominant hand to try and pluck the hair off, lightly scraping your tongue with a fingernail if you have to.

If that doesn't help, lick your arms. This often dislodges the hair and leaves it onto your arms.

If that doesn't help, go to a mirror and try to locate the hair on your tongue to pluck off.

If the hair is still there, try rinsing your mouth, but spit, don't swallow.

Tip

For some reason, licking your arms works better at getting rid of that annoying hair rather than rinsing your mouth out. You can try spitting the hair out, but generally that doesn't work, because the hair is too stuck in your mouth and tongue. Spitting is actually less socially acceptable than licking your arms.

Warning

Avoid using hand sanitizer if you can possibly help it. It makes your fingers taste horrible. Don't worry about looking silly--any onlookers are not the one who face a choking hazard.

About the Author

Rena Sherwood is a writer and Peter Gabriel fan who has lived in America and England. She has studied animals most of her life through direct observation and maintaining a personal library about pets. She has earned an associate degree in liberal arts from Delaware County Community College and a bachelor's degree in English from Millersville University.

Related Articles

More Related