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How to Write a Letter of Affirmation

By Michael Davidson ; Updated July 27, 2017

A letter of affirmation is a note that you write to yourself to put your thoughts and feelings on paper. This helps to crystallize what your goals and dreams are while encouraging positive thinking. Letters of affirmation are meant to focus on the positive elements of your life and can be classified as a love letter to yourself since the intent is to improve your self-esteem and to look at the brighter side of life as well as your personal traits. Affirmation letters help with distancing yourself from negativity and building self-confidence.

Address the letter to yourself. You'll be writing the letter in the third-person as if you're talking to a separate individual.

Start the letter by mentioning things that you admire about yourself. They can be general personality traits like intelligence and sense of humor or more minute details like how you gave a sandwich to a transient the other day. You can and should mention anything that makes you feel good about yourself.

Address any current challenges that you face in your life. Write them as challenges instead of obstacles since challenges offer more of an opportunity for personal growth. Address them with a tone of confidence that you will overcome them.

Mention your plans and attributes that will help you overcome these challenges. If you already have a specific plan of action in mind, mention it. If you don't, focus on your tenacity and other traits that will aid you in getting to where you want to be in your life.

Set several specific goals for yourself at the end of the letter. The goals should be positive in nature. For example, instead of saying you wish to lose weight, which focuses on the weight itself, write that you are slim and in shape. This helps focus the mind so you can achieve that vision.

Tip

Reread your affirmation letter in times of difficulty to give yourself confidence and a fresh perspective when you're feeling overwhelmed.

Keep your letter in the present tense when writing it so it is still speaking currently when you read it later.

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