How to Make Homemade Ear Drops

By Katrina Josey

Swimmer's ear can be painful and annoying but it is easily preventable and treatable. If you anticipate swimmer's ear, there are two solutions you can easily mix at home using low-cost household items to both treat and prevent the condition.

Swimmer's ear can be painful and annoying but it is easily preventable and treatable. If you anticipate swimmer's ear, there are two solutions you can easily mix at home using low-cost household items to both treat and prevent the condition.

Measure 1 ounce of isopropyl alcohol, 1 ounce of water and 1 ounce of white vinegar.

Clean and dry the plastic condiment bottle and place the funnel on top of it. Hold the funnel on the top of the bottle while pouring each liquid inside. Remove the funnel and shake gently to mix.

Transfer the solution to a small eye dropper bottle for storage. Label the blank bottle "ear drops" and the date so it's not mistaken for something else and so you know when to discard it. Store at room temperature for up to one week.

Swimmer's Ear Treatment Drops

Measure 1 teaspoon of tea tree oil and 1 teaspoon of olive oil.

Clean and dry the small plastic eye dropper bottle and place the funnel on top of it. Hold the funnel while pouring the oils in the bottle so no liquid spills out.

Close the bottle and mix thoroughly. Label, and store at room temperature for up to one year.

Tip

Use 3 to 4 drops of the swimmer's ear prevention solution immediately after swimming. Use 2 to 3 drops of the swimmer's ear treatment oil. Place cotton balls in the ears after using the oil so it doesn't leak out. The first signs of swimmer's ear are mild discomfort, redness and itching of the ear canal. Consult your doctor for an accurate diagnosis.

Warning

Either buy unused plastic containers or thoroughly clean and dry re- purposed containers to ensure that the solution doesn't mix with any residual chemicals in the bottles. Failing to do so could potentially make the substance harmful. Gently dry the ears with a blow dryer on low setting before using either drops. Bacteria grows in warm, moist places and drying the ears will help prevent swimmer's ear.

About the Author

Katrina Josey is an exercise physiologist and health education specialist in Ohio. She is experienced in the full life cycle of developing health and wellness programs. Katrina was the managing editor of a major website's fitness channel and has over 10 years of professional experience including clinical exercise testing. Her volunteer experience includes AmeriCorps service and wellness ministry work.

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