How to Lower Blood Pressure During Perimenopause

By Cathy Herold

Studies suggest that women are more susceptible to high blood pressure during perimenopause. Besides high blood pressure, estrogen and progesterone fluctuations during perimenopause can cause symptoms like irregular periods, mood swings and hot flashes. Perimenopause marks the beginning phase women go through to reach menopause. Perimenopuse typically lasts anywhere from two to eight years. It usually begins when a woman is in her 40s, but it can also start in the 30s. There are things a woman can do to keep blood pressure under control. Follow the steps below to lower high blood pressure during perimenopause.

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Studies suggest that women are more susceptible to high blood pressure during perimenopause. Besides high blood pressure, estrogen and progesterone fluctuations during perimenopause can cause symptoms like irregular periods, mood swings and hot flashes. Perimenopause marks the beginning phase women go through to reach menopause. Perimenopuse typically lasts anywhere from two to eight years. It usually begins when a woman is in her 40s, but it can also start in the 30s. There are things a woman can do to keep blood pressure under control. Follow the steps below to lower high blood pressure during perimenopause.

To lower high blood pressure during perimenopause, have a doctor evaluate all of your medications for side effects. Research suggests that some medications like hormone replacement therapy may produce high blood pressure for women in perimenopuse. If you are taking a prescription that may be causing high blood pressure, talk with your doctor about prescribing an alternative medication.

One of the best ways to lower blood pressure during perimenopause is to start a regular exercise program. The risks of high blood pressure for women in perimenopause increase especially as they age. Experts say a regular aerobic exercise program can reduce high blood pressure enough to eliminate the need to take high blood pressure medication. It's not necessary to run or jog every day. Regular brisk walks will help reduce high blood pressure for women who are in perimenopause.

Eat low-fat foods, fruits and vegetables. A healthy diet can reduce the risk of high blood pressure and lower an already elevated blood pressure for women who are in perimenopause. Make sure to avoid foods that are high in saturated fat, total fat and cholesterol. It's also good for women to avoid caffeine, nicotine, and sugary beverages as well as sweets. If you're overweight, lose weight to keep high blood pressure under control especially during perimenopause.

Lower sodium intake to 1,500 milligrams each day to reduce high blood pressure during perimenopause. Studies show that consuming less than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day keeps high blood pressure under control significantly.

To reduce high blood pressure during perimenopause, drink a few cups of green or oolong tea every day. Research reveals that drinking two or more cups of green or oolong tea reduces the inflammation that can cause high blood pressure.

If you are a woman in perimenopause and have high blood pressure, talk with a doctor about prescribing an antihypertensive medication. If you change your diet, exercise regularly, and limit sodium intake and your blood pressure is still high, it's probably best to take a prescription medicine that will help lower blood pressure.

Tip

Get a good night's rest by sleeping at least six hours to reduce high blood pressure. Drink one small glass of red wine to improve blood vessel health and reduce high blood pressure. Some studies suggest that taking up to 900 mg of garlic daily can be as effective as prescription blood pressure medication.

Warning

Always check with your doctor before starting any exercise or diet plan. Women in perimenopause should have their blood pressure checked regularly.

About the Author

Cathy Herold lives in Southern California and has been writing articles related to health, finances and education since 2007. Besides Demand Studios, Herold also writes for Suite101. Herold holds a Master of Arts in English from California State University Long Beach.

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