How to Get Suboxone

By Lee Mellott

Suboxone is a prescription medication designed to help individuals who are addicted to opiates such as morphine, codeine, oxycodone, heroin and others. It is comprised of buprenorphine with naloxone. Suboxone works on the receptors in the brain to alleviate withdrawal and other symptoms. Taking Suboxone can help opiate-dependent patients regain normal lives by reducing physical, mental, social and other problems created from opiate usage.

Suboxone is a prescription medication designed to help individuals who are addicted to opiates such as morphine, codeine, oxycodone, heroin and others. It is comprised of buprenorphine with naloxone. Suboxone works on the receptors in the brain to alleviate withdrawal and other symptoms. Taking Suboxone can help opiate-dependent patients regain normal lives by reducing physical, mental, social and other problems created from opiate usage.

Locate a physician that is certified to prescribe Suboxone. To prescribe Suboxone, a physician must be specifically trained and have a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) number. To locate a physician, type your ZIP code into the field on the home page of Suboxone's HeretoHelp.com website (see link in Resources).

Call a physician given in the list results and make an appointment. The list will give the name, address, telephone number and distance of physicians certified to prescribe Suboxone. Keep in mind that physicians are limited to treating 30 patients with Suboxone at 1 time so you may have to call more than 1 doctor.

Go to the appointment when you are in mild-to-moderate drug withdrawal. If you are in withdrawal, Suboxone will help you feel better. If you are not in withdrawal, Suboxone may make you feel worse.

Describe to the doctor your drug history. You may be given blood and urine tests to determine your health and drug usage. Take your 1st dose of Suboxone under your doctor's supervision at your appointment. After giving you your 1st dose, your doctor will give you a prescription for Suboxone in an amount to alleviate your withdrawal symptoms.

Fill the prescription at a pharmacy and use as directed by your physician. Be prepared to visit your doctor frequently to monitor your symptoms, dosage amounts and get a new prescription for Suboxone.

References

About the Author

Lee Mellott holds a Masters degree in education from Hood College. Her background includes freelance writing, Internet promotion, sales and education.

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