Drugs that Increase Metabolism

By Jacquelyn Jeanty

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report as much as 26.1 percent of U.S. adults were classified as overweight in 2008. Busy lifestyles of work, family and social obligations leave little time for exercise and proper meal preparation. As a result, drugs that increase the body's metabolism rate are in high demand.

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Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report as much as 26.1 percent of U.S. adults were classified as overweight in 2008. Busy lifestyles of work, family and social obligations leave little time for exercise and proper meal preparation. As a result, drugs that increase the body's metabolism rate are in high demand.

Identification

Close up of pills on a scientific chart.

A person's basal metabolism rate indicates how efficient the body is at processing its daily food intake. Genetics, lifestyle, dietary content and existing medical conditions all play a part in how well the body is able to process and eliminate food. And while there are drugs on the market that can help increase a person's metabolism rate, they can have adverse effects on the body. However, there are cases where a metabolism-boosting drug is needed.

FDA Approved

Close up of syringe and test tubes on medical chart.

Certain health conditions can make it difficult to lose weight, even with diet and exercise programs. In some cases, weight problems can pose a serious health risk. Metabolism-boosting drugs can help in cases where weight loss attempts have proved unsuccessful, or when excess weight poses a serious health risk. The FDA has approved two drugs--Meridia and Xenical--which can increase metabolism. Both are available by prescription and can be fairly expensive if an insurance carrier doesn't cover them. Possible side effects for Meridia include headache, dry mouth, constipation, insomnia and increased blood pressure. Possible side effects with Xenical include bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and frequent bowel movements.

LipoRidAM

Jar spilling red pills onto tabletop.

LipoRidAM is advertised as a weight-loss drug designed to increase metabolism without the use of stimulant ingredients. Thyroid production, metabolism rates, and neurotransmitter productions naturally decline when a person's dietary intake is reduced. The LipoRidAM formula contains an ingredient called gugglesterone that works to increase thyroid function. Other ingredients work to regulate amino acid metabolism throughout the body. However, LipoRidAM contains no appetite suppressants or fat-burning mechanism and may thereby limit its effectiveness as a weight-loss option.

Advantra-Z

Close up of a woman with pills and a glass of water.

Advantra-Z is a weight-loss formula that works to increase metabolism processes. One of the active ingredients is Synephrine, which acts as a fat-burning agent. Also included is a stimulant agent called Citrus Aurantium, which is reported to cause fewer side effects than other more commonly used stimulants. The Advantra-Z website provides information regarding the research trials that have been done using their product. This formula is also available in Slim10 and NuPhedrine supplement brands. Side effects associated with the use of Advantra-Z include constipation and bloating.

Considerations

Young woman doing stretches on a mat at the gym.

Drugs that increase metabolism can help in terms of weight loss, but they're only effective for as long as a person continues taking them. Once a particular drug is discontinued, a person's metabolism rate will go back to where it was at the start. Also of concern is how stimulant ingredients, in particular, increase the body's hormone production. When used for prolonged periods of time, the body's ability to produce hormones naturally may decline, which can lead to other problems. Combining proper diet and regular exercise with a metabolism-boosting drug will help the body maintain any increases in metabolism.

References

About the Author

Jacquelyn Jeanty has worked as a freelance writer since 2008. Her work appears at various websites. Her specialty areas include health, home and garden, Christianity and personal development. Jeanty holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Purdue University.

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