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Chili Oil Nutrition

By Owen Pearson

Chili oil is a simple oil used in Asian cuisine, particularly in Chinese and Thai cooking. Although the ingredients used vary somewhat by region, most types of chili oil are made from chili peppers soaked in oil such as olive, soybean or canola oil. The oil is sometimes heated slowly at about 180 degrees F for two or three hours to allow the it to more effectively soak up the heat and flavor of the peppers. Chili oil can be refrigerated for up to one month, according to the Food Network website.

Calories

The caloric content of chili oil depends on the type of oil and the amount of chili peppers used in preparation. Canola and soybean oils provide about 120 calories per tablespoon, while a tablespoon of olive oil contains about 40 calories, according to the Calorie Counter website. A 100g serving of fresh chili peppers contains about 21 calories.

Fat

Because oils are comprised of fats, all types of oil used to make chili oil derive 100 percent of their calories from fat. Olive oil contains about 4.5g of fat per tablespoon, or about seven percent of the recommended daily fat intake. Canola and soybean oils contain about 13.6g of fat in each tablespoon, which is about 21 percent of the recommended daily allowance, according to the Calorie Counter website. Chili peppers contain about 0.1g of fat per 100g serving.

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Saturated Fats

Canola, soybean and olive oils are all relatively low in saturated fat, according to the Calorie Counter website. Soybean and canola oils contain about five percent of the daily recommended allowance, or about 1.1g per 1 tbsp serving. Olive oil provides about 0.6g, or about three percent of the daily allowance of saturated fat per tablespoon. Chili peppers do not contain saturated fats.

Carbohydrates

All types of oil commonly used in making chili oil--canola, soybean and olive, contain no carbohydrates. According to the Calorie Counter website, a 100g serving of chili peppers provides about 5.1g of carbohydrates.

Protein

A 100g serving of chili peppers contains less than 1g of protein. There is no protein in canola, olive or soybean oils, according to the Calorie Counter website.

Vitamins and Minerals

Oils used to make chili oil are not significant sources of vitamins or minerals, notes the Calorie Counter website. Chili peppers provide small amounts of several important nutrients--a 100g serving contains about 68mg of vitamin C, 36 IU of vitamin A and 10 mcg of folate.

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