Looking to Get in Shape or Lose Weight? Try our BMI and Weight Loss Calculator!

Uses of Magnets in Medicine

By Keri Honea ; Updated July 27, 2017

Magnetic therapy for healing has been around for centuries. Many ancient civilizations, such as the Greeks, Hebrews, Indians, Chinese and Egyptians, used magnets for medical purposes. It's only been recently that using magnets has come back into medical use. No one exactly knows how the magnets promote healing, but it's theorized that magnets attract metal elements in the body, such as iron in blood, to increase blood circulation and therefore instigate healing.

Pain Relief

The increase in blood flow from magnets delivers more oxygen and natural painkillers called endorphins, which in turn relieves minor pain.

Anti-Inflammatory

In addition to relieving pain, magnets can reduce inflammation with the increased blood circulation. When inflammation decreases, the body can also heal more quickly.

Detoxification

Magnets can also attract the positive charges of various toxins created by the body's immune system when fighting infection. The increased blood flow will then escort the toxins to the liver for speedy detoxification and eventual elimination from the body through the kidneys.

Multiple Sclerosis

Several case studies have found that magnetic fields seem to relieve symptoms of MS. Treatment with pulsed electromagnetic fields seems to relieve pain and muscle spasms as well as improve fatigue, cognition, vision and bladder control.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is one of the more popular forms of radiology, which uses a magnetic field scanner to detect the positively charged ions of water throughout the human body. The resulting radiographs display stark contrasts between the various soft tissues throughout the body, which has made it the preferred radiology technique for neurological and musculoskeletal imaging.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

Related Articles

More Related