How to Use Oxymizer vs. Nasal Cannula

By Vanessa Padgalskas

Both oxymizers and nasal cannulas are used to deliver oxygen through the nose. They are used by people with pulmonary conditions that require the use of pure oxygen 24 hours a day. Oxymizers and nasal cannulas are attached to a portable oxygen tank that can be taken outside the home providing more mobility to those in need of oxygen or to large at-home oxygen systems.

Both oxymizers and nasal cannulas are used to deliver oxygen through the nose. They are used by people with pulmonary conditions that require the use of pure oxygen 24 hours a day. Oxymizers and nasal cannulas are attached to a portable oxygen tank that can be taken outside the home providing more mobility to those in need of oxygen or to large at-home oxygen systems.

Attach your oxymizer to its recommended system, such as an XCP or XCR oxygen system. An oxymizer is not compatible with any EDS system. There are different versions of oxymizers for different systems. Attach your nasal cannula to the oxygen tank with which it is compatible.

Separate the tubes to the side of the nasal prongs and slide the tubes around your ears. The process for putting an oxymizer or nasal cannula on your face is the same.

Insert the nasal prongs into your nose. On the oxymizer, the "mustache" portion should fit comfortably across the bottom of your nose.

Adjust the fit of the oxymizer or nasal cannula by moving the loop adjustment collar located near your neck. Slide it up or down to tighten or loosen the fitting of the tubes around your ears.

Turn on the oxygen tank and breathe normally. With a nasal cannula, the oxygen will flow continuously. With an oxymizer, the oxygen will flow only when you inhale. An oxymizer controls the oxygen flow and saves up to three times more oxygen than a nasal cannula.

About the Author

Vanessa Padgalskas was born and raised in Spokane, Wash., and currently resides in Portland, Ore. Padgalskas graduated from American University in 2007 with degrees in international studies and economics. She holds a law degree from Lewis and Clark Law School.

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