How to Stop Swelling From a Mosquito Bite Near the Eye

By Melissa Morang

Mosquito bites are caused by the female mosquito. Itching and swelling occur when your immune system reacts to proteins in the saliva of the mosquito, according to the Mayo Clinic. Try to use a mosquito repellent when going into an area heavily infested with mosquitoes. If you do get bitten by a mosquito and develop swelling near your eye, however, there are methods you can use to reduce the swelling.

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Mosquito bites are caused by the female mosquito. Itching and swelling occur when your immune system reacts to proteins in the saliva of the mosquito, according to the Mayo Clinic. Try to use a mosquito repellent when going into an area heavily infested with mosquitoes. If you do get bitten by a mosquito and develop swelling near your eye, however, there are methods you can use to reduce the swelling.

Take Ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is an anti-inflammatory medicine, so it will help reduce the swelling.

Apply a cold compress for at least 15 minutes every hour. The ice will reduce the swelling near the eye.

Apply aloe vera gel to the spot. Aloe vera reduces swelling and itching and can be soothing to the skin.

Take an antihistamine. This can help "counter-act the swelling caused by insect stings and many kinds of allergic reactions," according to Thomas Platts-Mills, M.D., Ph.D., head of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center in Charlottesville. Take the recommended dosage on the box.

Warning

See a doctor immediately if you develop hives, shortness of breath, wheezing, difficulty swallowing and become light-headed. A local reaction such as swelling is normal. Seek medical attention if your swelling or pain keeps you from performing your normal activities or keeps you awake.

References

About the Author

Melissa Morang began writing professionally in 2002. She has created sales scripts for telemarketing companies and contributes to online publications. Morang has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Minnesota.

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