How to Sanitize an Electric Toothbrush

By Avery Martin

Sanitizing a toothbrush helps to maintain cleanliness and good hygiene. This is especially important if a family member is sick or recently recovered from an illness. Microbes can grow on the bristles and the handle of the toothbrush quite easily. Not all of these microbes are dangerous, but some can be harmful and cause sickness. Since replacing the head of an electronic toothbrush is not always cost-effective, sanitizing a toothbrush provides a way to keep your toothbrush clean with the use of common household items.

...

Sanitizing a toothbrush helps to maintain cleanliness and good hygiene. This is especially important if a family member is sick or recently recovered from an illness. Microbes can grow on the bristles and the handle of the toothbrush quite easily. Not all of these microbes are dangerous, but some can be harmful and cause sickness. Since replacing the head of an electronic toothbrush is not always cost-effective, sanitizing a toothbrush provides a way to keep your toothbrush clean with the use of common household items.

Wash your hands before and after brushing your teeth to avoid transferring germs from your hands to the toothbrush. Use soap and the hottest water you can stand for at least 20 seconds.

Hold your toothbrush under running water and scrub the bristles with your thumb to remove any remaining toothpaste. Scrub the toothbrush until it appears to the naked eye to be thoroughly clean.

Create a solution of 3 percent hydrogen peroxide to soak the toothbrush. Mix 1 teaspoon peroxide with 1 cup water and dip your toothbrush into the solution before brushing your teeth.

Clean your toothbrush head in the dishwasher once a month by placing it on the top shelf, with the heated dry selection off to avoid melting the toothbrush.

Tip

Once a week, leave your toothbrush in a cup of vinegar when you go to sleep to sanitize the toothbrush. Be careful to avoid soaking any of the electronic components. Most electronic toothbrushes have detachable heads, which makes it easy to remove and sanitize the head.

References

About the Author

Avery Martin holds a Bachelor of Music in opera performance and a Bachelor of Arts in East Asian studies. As a professional writer, she has written for Education.com, Samsung and IBM. Martin contributed English translations for a collection of Japanese poems by Misuzu Kaneko. She has worked as an educator in Japan, and she runs a private voice studio out of her home. She writes about education, music and travel.

Related Articles

More Related