How to Remove a Callus on a Finger

By Traci Joy

A callus is a thick, hardened layer of skin that has developed as a means of protecting itself from repeated use. Using hand tools, playing certain instruments or using a pen or pencil repeatedly are examples of how a callus will form. While calluses are protective, they can also be unsightly and irritating. Removing or softening a callus can be done at home. However, if you repeat the activity that caused the calluses, they can redevelop once again.

...

A callus is a thick, hardened layer of skin that has developed as a means of protecting itself from repeated use. Using hand tools, playing certain instruments or using a pen or pencil repeatedly are examples of how a callus will form. While calluses are protective, they can also be unsightly and irritating. Removing or softening a callus can be done at home. However, if you repeat the activity that caused the calluses, they can redevelop once again.

Pour hot water into a small basin. Add 1/2 cup of Epsom salts.

Soak callused finger

Soak your callused finger in the Epsom salt soak for 15 minutes. Remove from water and lightly pat dry.

Put petroleum jelly on the skin surrounding the callus, but not on the callus. Using the pumice stone, rub back and forth on the callus for 2 to 3 minutes. Wipe callus clean.

Apply bandage over callus

Apply petroleum jelly over top of the callus. Cover it with an adhesive bandage. Leave the bandage on for at least one hour, but preferably for up to 4 hours.

Perform this treatment twice a day, morning and evening. After the evening treatment, leave the petroleum jelly and adhesive bandage on overnight.

Continue this treatment until the callus has softened. If it returns in the future, begin reapplying the treatment.

Tip

If you are diabetic, speak to your physician before treating any skin condition.

To prevent future calluses, apply petroleum jelly over the area receiving pressure and wear gloves.

Warning

Never cut or trim a callus with an instrument as this can lead to infection.

References

About the Author

A certified nutritionist who majored in health, fitness and nutrition, Traci Vandermark has been writing articles in her specialty fields since 1998. Her articles have appeared both online and in print for publications such as Simple Abundance, "Catskill Country Magazine," "Birds and Blooms," "Cappers" and "Country Discoveries."

Related Articles

More Related