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Alkaline Water for Hair Loss

By Juliet Wilkinson

The effects of alkaline drinking water on hair loss are debated in scientific circles. Proponents claim that maintaining an elevated, or alkalinic, pH by drinking alkaline water can stop hair loss, inhibit disease processes and purify the skin. On the other side of the debate, experts such as Katherine Zeratsky, RD of the Mayo Clinic, state plain water is fine for most adults. Drinking alkaline water is not difficult, but it can become costly. The decision to try this hair loss and wellness cure is solely up to you. See your doctor to discuss the benefits before giving it a try.

Learn the pH of your tap water. Most city water sources are mildly acidic, which can cause pipe erosion, leeching of heavy metals and glass erosion over time. You can find water pH kits at most retail pool supply stores. Advocates of alkaline water purport that water should have a pH greater than 7.0.

Purchase and install a water ionizer or alkaline drops if your water is acidic, or having a pH of less than 7.0. Water ionizers are counter top devices that alkalize your tap water source, altering the pH and buffering the acidity of your drinking water. Drinking alkaline water does not have any guaranteed effects against hair loss; there is no set amount of how much water to drink for hair loss treatment.

Drink at least 3 L of water per day for men and 2.2 L daily for women. This equals out to almost 13 cups for a man and 9 cups for a woman. Consider your exercise and environment in your water replenishment; if you exercise often or live in a hot environment you may need more water to keep hydrated.

Tips

If you have a water filtration system installed in your home try checking the pH of your unfiltered water against that which is purified. You may find your home system is buffering your water pH to a degree without added expense.

Warnings

Discuss altering the pH of your drinking water with your physician if you suffer any chronic medical conditions or are pregnant or nursing.

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