→ Start healthfully with our BMI Weight Loss Calculator

Soy Nuts Vs. Edamame

By Brian Willett

Edamame and soy nuts are both food products made from soy, but they have slightly different nutritional values. Edamame is another name for the soybean, while soy nuts, despite the name, are not nuts -- they are made by soaking soybeans and then baking them until they have a nutty, crunchy consistency. Although the nutritional characteristics of the two foods are similar, one may be more beneficial than the other based on your nutritional needs.

Calorie Content

Soy nuts and edamame provide a similar amount of calories. A 1/4-cup serving of soy nuts provides 120 calories, while a 1/4-cup serving of edamame provides 100 calories. Even if you are trying to lose weight, this difference is unlikely to significantly affect your progress, as switching from soy nuts to edamame would save you just 140 calories if you consumed 1/4 cup each day. That amount is just 4 percent of the calories you need to cut to lose a pound.

Fat Content

Soy nuts and edamame contain nearly the same amount of fat. A 1/4-cup serving of soy nuts contains 4 g of fat, while the same-sized serving of edamame contains 3 g of fat. Neither food contains any saturated fat, a type of fat that may increase your risk of heart disease. The American Heart Association suggests consuming a total of 50 to 70 g of protein each day.

Carbohydrate Content

Although soy nuts and edamame are both relatively low in carbohydrates, they are both rich in dietary fiber. A 1/4-cup of edamame provides 10 g of carbohydrates, with 3 g of dietary fiber. A 1/4-cup of soy nuts provides 9 g of carbohydrates, with 5 g of dietary fiber. Dietary fiber is an essential nutrient that promotes healthy digestion and may aid in weight loss, because it makes you feel full. Soy nuts also contain 3 g of sugar, while edamame contains none.

Protein Content

Edamame and soy nuts are both rich in protein. A 1/4-cup serving of soy nuts contains 12 g of protein, while a 1/4-cup serving of edamame provides 9 g of protein. Protein is a vital nutrient that helps your body build and repair cells and tissues. Soy and quinoa are the only two types of plants that are complete protein sources, meaning they provide all of the essential amino acids.

Video of the Day

Brought to you by LIVESTRONG
Brought to you by LIVESTRONG

More Related Articles

Related Articles