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Casein-Free Diet Foods

By A.L. Kennedy

Casein is a protein found in cow's milk, goat's milk and products made from these types of milk, such as cheese, butter and yogurt. It is also used as an additive in many processed foods. Casein can cause allergic reactions in some people, particularly in children. Symptoms may include an itchy rash or hives, difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting and even loss of consciousness, according to The GFCF Diet. Keeping casein-free diet foods in mind when you shop for groceries can help you or a family member with casein allergy eat well while avoiding casein.

Fruits and Vegetables

Raw fruits and vegetables are naturally casein-free, according to The GFCF Diet. Most frozen and canned fruits and vegetables are also casein-free. You can ensure the ones you buy are casein-free by checking the label. If the label does not list casein, caseinate or a caseinate compound like calcium caseinate or sodium caseinate, it is casein-free.

Proteins

Meats, including poultry, fish, and shellfish are casein-free in their natural state, according to the article "Eating Without Casein" by Beth Kevles. However, read the packages on processed meat products, like fish sticks and pepperoni, carefully to avoid any traces of casein. Nuts and seeds are also naturally casein-free, but processed nut products may contain casein or have been manufactured in a factory where dairy is used in other products. Avoid cow's milk, goat's milk, and any product made with or containing these types of milk, as it contains casein. Many dairy replacement products, like cheese substitutes and margarine, also contain casein.

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Grain Products

According to "Eating Without Casein," grain products may contain casein, particularly if they are baked goods like bread, cakes and cookies. Reading bread packages and other baked-good packages is essential in order to ensure the products are safe for someone with a casein allergy. Remember that items baked into the product may contain casein even if the rest of the product does not. For example, chocolate-chip cookies may have chocolate chips in them that contain casein, even if the cookie dough is casein-free.

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