How to Tape Knuckles

By Phillip Chappell

Taping your knuckles is an important aspect of fighting sports such as boxing and martial arts. For full support and safety of the bones in your hand and wrist, you should wrap the tape from above your wrist, down to your knuckles. For full performance, it is important to be able to make a fist after taping. The tighter the tape, the more secure your bones will be, but you want to ensure you don't cut off circulation.

Start taping from a few inches above your wrist. The first wrap should be about one-third up your forearm.

Overlap the second wrap over the first closer to your wrist and then overlap the third, which is just before your wrist, but ensure you have full wrist movement.

Pass the tape across the top of your hand to your knuckles and wrap it around twice; cut the tape at the palm of your hand.

Cut two equally sized pieces of tape that measure from the second knuckle of your first finger to one-third up your forearm. Overlap the two pieces into an "X" and push them down onto your palm and under your forearm.

Secure the pieces in Step 4 by wrapping a piece around your hand and one just above your wrist.

Fold the top and bottom of the pieces in Step 4 to secure them to the top and bottom pieces in Step 5.

Overlap two additional pieces around your hand. Overlap three pieces around the already-taped section of your forearm.

Cross a piece from the outside of your wrist to the base of your thumb where it meets your hand. Continue the piece around the outside of your hand and over to the base of your thumb where it meets your wrist. Wrap it over your wrist and secure it to the starting point.

References

About the Author

Phillip Chappell has been a professional writer in Canada since 2008. He began his work as a freelancer for "Senior Living Magazine" before being hired at the "Merritt News" in British Columbia, where he wrote mostly about civic affairs. He is a temporary reporter for the "Rocky Mountain Outlook." Chappell holds a Bachelor of Journalism in computer programming from University College of the Cariboo.

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