How to Keep Your Eye on the Ball in a Golf Swing

By Steve Silverman

Many sports require the participant to keep his eye on the ball. Just like baseball, it is essential for the golfer to keep his eye on the ball. This is one of the first lessons all golfers learn after they become familiar with holding a golf club and standing over the ball. However, even veteran golfers have a hard time putting this primary lesson into practice on a consistent basis.

Take a balanced stance when you address the ball. Your left shoulder (for a right-handed golfer) needs to be facing your target. Your left foot needs to be directly underneath your left shoulder. Your feet should be shoulder-width apart and your knees should be slightly bent in an athletic position.

Train your eyes on the ball, now that you have finished setting your stance. Specifically, focus on the back and center portion of the ball. This is where you want the club to make contact with the ball. Your chin should be pointed toward the ground, but your eyes should be tilted slightly and you should be concentrating on the ball.

Take your club back to begin your swing. There is no reason to rush your takeaway. Many golfers--especially beginners--tend to rush their swing and this will start with the takeaway. When you rush it, you tend to move your head; when that happens you stop concentrating on the back of the ball.

Stay focused on the back of the ball as you begin your downswing. After you have brought your club up to shoulder height, transfer your weight from your back leg towards your front leg. This is done by feel. There is no reason to avert your eyes as you get the club near the hitting zone.

Keep your eyes focused on the back of the ball after contact is made. Many golfers are so anxious to see the result of their shot that they pick up their heads before finishing their swing. This is a big mistake and will usually result in a mis-hit. Do not pick up your head until your club has cleared your hips on the follow through.

References

About the Author

Steve Silverman is an award-winning writer, covering sports since 1980. Silverman authored The Minnesota Vikings: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly and Who's Better, Who's Best in Football -- The Top 60 Players of All-Time, among others, and placed in the Pro Football Writers of America awards three times. Silverman holds a Master of Science in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism.

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