How to Install Toe Clips

By Rogue Parrish

Toe clips or cages help you place the ball of your feet correctly on your bicycle pedals and let you pull up on the pedal for a more powerful stroke. Much of the effort of attaching them to the pedals for the first time involves figuring out where they go; the actual attachment is generally quite straightforward.

Remove the front reflector attached to the pedal if present. Line up the boltholes or slots in the bottom of the metal clip with the bolt holes on front of the pedal.

Push the bolts through the clip and the pedal and tighten the nuts with a wrench or Allen key. For certain pedal models, a bolt may fit a machined opening in the pedal such that no nut is necessary.

Feed the free end of the strap through the slot in the pedal cage, beginning at the side away from the bottom bracket, also called the non-axle side. Pull it with pliers if it is too tight to move with just your fingers.

Twist the strap a half-turn so it stays in place and continue threading the strap through the second slot nearest the bottom bracket.

Thread the strap through the opening or openings at the top of the clips. Check if the buckle end of the strap is about 2 inches from the pedal's outside edge. Leave enough slack between the buckle and the pedal cage to slow down the gradual wearing of the strap by the cage, recommends bike DIY author Fred Milson in "Complete Bike Maintenance."

Feed the strap through the buckle so that the strap fits your shoe loosely and you can remove your feet quickly if you have to stop. Tighten the strap firmly only if you are in the final push of a road race and need your feet especially firmly attached to the pedals.

Proceed to do your second pedal as you did the first in Steps 1 through 6.

References

About the Author

An award-winning writer and editor, Rogue Parrish has worked at the Washington Post, the Baltimore Sun and at newspapers from England to Alaska. This world adventurer and travel book author, who graduates summa cum laude in journalism from the University of Maryland, specializes in travel and food -- as well as sports and fitness. She's also a property manager and writes on DIY projects.

Related Articles

More Related