golfers are plagued by one of two problems: hitting an unintentional hook or an unintentional slice. Of the two options, hitting the hook is the better of the two evils. The ball tends to roll farther with a hook, so you don't lose all of the distance a slice loses. Of course, hooking or slicing the ball out of bounds is simply frustrating. Fortunately, you can fix your golf hook. The goal should be to fix the hook to have a slight draw instead of changing the ball flight to a slice. For better players, the goal is to learn to hit a draw or fade on command."/> How to Fix a Golf Hook | Healthfully

How to Fix a Golf Hook

By Contributor

Most golfers are plagued by one of two problems: hitting an unintentional hook or an unintentional slice. Of the two options, hitting the hook is the better of the two evils. The ball tends to roll farther with a hook, so you don't lose all of the distance a slice loses. Of course, hooking or slicing the ball out of bounds is simply frustrating. Fortunately, you can fix your golf hook. The goal should be to fix the hook to have a slight draw instead of changing the ball flight to a slice. For better players, the goal is to learn to hit a draw or fade on command.

Grab the club you hook the ball with the most (probably the driver) and go to the local driving range. Rent a bucket of balls and warm up with a few stretches and practice swings (don't hit balls yet).

Pick a target on the range to hit with the golf ball.

Line up to hit the first golf ball toward the target.

Check your foot, hip and shoulder positions as you hold the golf club along your hips and horizontal to the ground. The club should point toward your target. Hold the golf club at your shoulders and check it.

Place the golf club on the ground and along your toes. Step back to see where you are pointed.

Address the ball again and make changes to your body position to line yourself up to the target.

Hit five or six balls and look at the ball flight. Make sure you check your alignment before each hit. If you are no longer hooking the ball, your body was trying to make up for poor aim and alignment.

Address the ball again, and look down at your grip. If you see three or more knuckles on your left hand, you are using a strong grip. Loosen the club in your hands, rotating your hands to the left and around the club until you see two knuckles on your left hand (this may feel awkward).

Hit five or six more balls with your new grip. You can rotate your grip on the club a little to the left or right to dial in a slight draw instead of the hook. Don't make big changes in your grip.

Adjust grip pressure if you are still hooking the ball. Hold the club with just enough pressure to keep it in your hands during the swing. Add a little more grip pressure with your left hand, and hit five or six more balls.

Hit through the rest of the balls, focusing on your alignment and the changes you made to fix the hook.

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