How to Bake Ice Hockey Skates

By Alan Bass

Although not always required, baking your brand new ice hockey skates is the best way to properly mold them to your feet. Although it sounds dangerous, with the proper technique, instruction, and equipment, the process is quite simple. Just remember to follow the instructions carefully so that you do not damage your very expensive pair of skates!

Prepare the Baking Process

Place one of your ice hockey skates on a large baking sheet. Preheat your kitchen oven to 180 degrees Fahrenheit. Untie your skate as much as possible so that slipping it on your foot after heating is smooth and effortless. When the oven hits 180 degrees, turn the oven completely off.

Bake Your Skates

After you've turned the preheated oven off, place one skate on the baking sheet and place the baking sheet in the oven. Close the door and let bake for 6-10 minutes. Be sure to closely supervise your baking skate, as any overheating of it can result in the splitting of the boot or permanent damage to the skate.

Remove Skates From the Oven and Put Them On

When your skate has been properly heated, remove it from the oven and put it on your foot (while wearing on your foot whatever you would normally wear to play hockey). Tie the skate as tight as you can, without over-stressing the eyelets. This will help the skate mold as closely as possible to the shape of your foot, so that when you continue to use it in the future, they fit perfectly. Keep your skate on for 15-20 minutes while in a seated position, with your foot on the floor. Do not walk around with the heated skate on, as it can affect the shape of the molding.

Remove Skate and Let Rest

After the skate has molded to your foot, unlace and remove it, and allow it to cool in an upright position for at least 24 hours. This will allow the skate the proper time to cool down and harden the molding that you just created. At the point you remove the first skate, you can go ahead and repeat the process for the second skate.

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