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Dangerous Levels of Caffeine

By Nicole Crawford

Dangerous Levels of Caffeine

Status: Draft View Site Notes Editorial Guidelines Topic View Style Guide Track Changes Return to the Work Desk

Please review and confirm that you wish to publish this article Comments from the Content Evaluator: To Demand Staff: Needs rewrite because article does not have information about high energy drinks and the possible effects. To Writer: Please provide an overview of the topic, including where caffeine is found, how people might ingest too much, what symptoms occur, and what to do about it. Here is one article that might help: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/BuyingUsingMedicineSafely/UnderstandingOver-the-CounterMedicines/UCM205286.pdf Be sure to include warnings about high energy drinks - see FDA.gov. Thanks. 02/12/2014

Introduction

Dangerous Levels of Caffeine

Status: Draft View Site Notes Editorial Guidelines Topic View Style Guide Track Changes Return to the Work Desk

Please review and confirm that you wish to publish this article Comments from the Content Evaluator: To Demand Staff: Needs rewrite because article does not have information about high energy drinks and the possible effects. To Writer: Please provide an overview of the topic, including where caffeine is found, how people might ingest too much, what symptoms occur, and what to do about it. Here is one article that might help: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/BuyingUsingMedicineSafely/UnderstandingOver-the-CounterMedicines/UCM205286.pdf Be sure to include warnings about high energy drinks - see FDA.gov. Thanks. 02/12/2014

Introduction

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Caffeine is a stimulant that occurs naturally in coffee, tea and chocolate. It is also added to a variety of products, including energy drinks, soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, candy, gum, migraine headache medications and other medications. (Ref.4) Most people can tolerate 100 to 200 mg of caffeine every day, an amount equal to about to cups of coffee, cups of tea or soft drinks, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (Ref. 4) Extremely high doses, however, can cause serious and even life-threatening side effects. (Ref. 4) The amount of caffeine tolerated by the body varies among individuals, but the FDA warns that 600 mg -- the amount in 4 to 7 cups of coffee - is clearly _. (Ref. 4) CNS effect stimulant insomnia fast heart rate ER visits high risk groups - kids can lead to death sources - energy drinks, alcohol combinations, caffeine tablets to stay awak avoid combining with other cafffeine products FDA - 600 mg (4 to 7 cups)

FDA 600 mg kids individual response check levels - ref 6 and 8 Caffeinism

Consuming 1,000 to 1,500 mg of caffeine can cause symptoms such as difficulty sleeping, [restlessness, agitation, excitement, rambling thought and speech, and insomnia. ], according to a report published in the ___ 2005 issue of "Advances in Psychiatric Treatment." (Ref. 5) Caffeinism, caffeine intoxication Mimics anxiety and other disorders Energy Drink Overdose

[The minimum and maximum symptomatic caffeine levels were 200 mg (4 mg/kg) in a 13-year-old with jitteriness and 1622 mg (35.5 mg/kg) in a 14-year-old. The maximum volume consumed was fifteen 250-mL cans (11.5 mg/kg caffeine) during 1 hour.46 One 23-year-old chronic energy drink consumer had a myocardial infarction.46] Ref 1?? kids, young people levels not established i unit? intoxication Potentially Fatal Levels

DAWN report Ref 3 hypokalemia Stacker 2 Warnings

pregnancy ref 7 kids

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